How It All Began: My Journey into Abstract Art

My First Abstract Painting is called: "Splatter."

Splatter is the very first abstract painting I have ever created. Splatter literally began my identity as a painter.  I created Splatter during my first year of law school. During this time, I was working so very hard to do well in law school. I was studying, dedicated to learning the law 24/7. However, it was a struggle for me. During this time I was very conflicted. There was one part of me, where I knew I was an artist and that I really wanted to pursue art as a profession, and then another part of me that wanted be to successful in law school. I enjoyed what I was learning and wanted to do well. One evening after school, after being very tired and frustrated, I decided to come home and paint. I had three 24 x 36 inch blank canvases, still wrapped in plastic, that I was saving for a great and grand idea. In that moment, I decided to not care whether I had an idea for those canvases and just release all of my pent up anger, frustration, confusion, insecurity, fears and anxieties onto the canvas. That night, something extraordinary happened--I became an artist. 

 "Splatter" by AVM Hawkins; 2009, Acrylic on Canvas; In The Private Collection of Lindsey Vignaud Marshall

"Splatter" by AVM Hawkins; 2009, Acrylic on Canvas; In The Private Collection of Lindsey Vignaud Marshall

Splatter was the very first canvas, of the three, I painted. I had the blank canvas laid on my mom's garage floor. My first move as an artist was to drop paint onto the canvas from above. After "dropping" a few colors, I "saw" and "knew" instantly, that I must stop. There was something beautiful and amazing captured in that moment and that I should not go any further. I instantly moved the canvas from my work area and placed it on the side, laying flat so it could dry. It would be the first abstract painting I ever created.

 Collector: Attorney Lindsey Vignaud Marshall with "Splatter."

Collector: Attorney Lindsey Vignaud Marshall with "Splatter."